Tag Archives: Skill Set

Luxury or Necessity?

11 Jan

This morning, this article about a local to me high school caught my eye.  The title alone is thought provoking “Injury prompts Shanksville to reconsider athletic trainer.”  Somehow this school thought it prudent to cut $2,500 in spending and not provide basic athletic training services for the athletes of the school.  According to the PIAA, this school has an enrollment of 105 students in 9-12 grade and competes in 5 boys’ and 7 girls’ sports.  Basketball is the only contact sport listed, but in my experience baseball, softball, cross country, tennis and volleyball are all sports that keep the AT busy.

Today’s economy and lack of funding for public education has school districts, private schools and even public and private colleges and universities closely examining budgets.  The economic climate has administrations at every level attempting to answer the question “Is the provision of athletic training services a luxury that we provide our athletes or Continue reading

New AT proves her worth very quickly

12 Oct

Joe Chandler of the Gazette Virginian highlights the work of athletic trainer Leslie Hodge at Halifax County HS.   He has some very good things to say of her work:

Some people consider an athletic trainer a luxury item when it comes to a high school sports program. However, when one considers the number of student-athletes that participate in sports, an athletic trainer is more of a necessity than a luxury. Continue reading

News – Athletic Trainers are a need and a neccesity

4 Oct

There is not much I need to add to this article out of Illinois.  Read it for yourself and enjoy!

Here are some notable quotes from the article though to think about:

  • “When you look at needs and wants, you have to look at athletic trainers in high school situations as a need and a necessity,” Sarver said. “There are items that you can cut back on, but you never want to put doubt in front of our student-athletes’ health and well-being.”
  • “They are a huge, huge asset to your programs and to the school,” said Tom McGunnigal, St. Bede’s athletic director and long-time girls basketball coach.
  • Athletic trainers are something that makes the lives of coaches and administrations that much easier.
  • With an athletic trainer at most every high school event, coaches no longer have to worry when a player goes down.
  • “Coaches don’t need to be diagnosing. They need to be coaching,” said Todd Hopkins, the Ottawa Marquette athletic director, as well as girls basketball and baseball coach. “(Our trainer) knows what to do. Especially with the new concussion rules, if someone gets dinged or something, she knows what she is doing.”
  • “In today’s society, it’s very important that schools have a trainer on-site,” said Ottawa athletic director and girls basketball coach Mike Cooper. “As many activities as we have here at Ottawa High School and the number of injuries that we have, the ability to handle those injuries in-house in a quick and timely fashion means that we can avoid a lot of potential problems down the road.”
  • “Kids can go see them first and then they can give a recommendation,” Cooper said. “If our trainers can deal with it right here at the school, they could save a lot of money (for families) than if you go straight to a doctor or to a specialist.”
  • “That’s the best of both worlds,” Sarver said. “We get them evaluated and treated as quickly as possible when they are on the field or on the court or on the diamond or on the mat, but then when they come back from that injury, our trainers are the ones helping them with the rehab. They bring our student-athletes back at a fast rate because they are working with them on a daily basis.”
Some great quotes there to prove your worth to the high school.

Skill Set – Resiliency

26 Aug

The typical athletic trainer has a diverse skill set that they constantly develop.  This series of blog entries will seek to focus on the skill set that most athletic trainers possess in order to effectively do their job in the traditional setting.  Collectively, this skill set makes the AT a very valuable and unique resource to the athletes, coaches and administration that they serve.

Resiliency

Resiliency is a buzzword around our school district this year and a major theme for our teachers and administration during our In-Service seminars heading into the new year.  As I sat and listened to our administration speak on resiliency, it hit me that this is a prominent skill that ATs have had for years.  Athletic trainers are resilient. Continue reading

News – Certified Athletic Trainers Key to Diagnosing and Treatment of Concussions

21 Aug

Idaho – For the past few years, there has been increasing awareness within the media of the problem of concussions in high school sports.  This awareness has raised the level of concern by parents, coaches and administrators, but the awareness hasn’t raised the collective knowledge level.  Proper recognition and treatment of concussions is still a problem.

Zach Kyle of the Idaho State Journal wrote an outstanding piece on the problem.  He writes:

Concussions always will be a reality in high school sports. Continue reading

Technology has changed the profession

20 Jun

A feature article on athletic trainers was published yesterday in my local paper, the Harrisburg (PA) Patriot News.  Among the 3 articles about our profession was an article highlighting a local athletic training legend – Dick Burkholder, or Burke (long e) as he is known to his colleagues.

Burke has been at Carlisle High School since 1960 and has obviously not only seen the profession grow and change, he helped shape it.

It has been my pleasure to get to know Burke through the years and he remains passionate about advancing and improving Continue reading

Skill Set – Relationships

24 May

The typical athletic trainer has a diverse skill set that they constantly develop.  This series of blog entries will seek to focus on the skill set that most athletic trainers possess in order to effectively do their job in the traditional setting.  Collectively, this skill set makes the AT a very valuable and unique resource to the athletes, coaches and administration that they serve.

Relationships

It is my firm personal belief that God created us for relationship.  Relationship with God and relationships with fellow mankind.  The most gratifying things in life revolve around relationships – life long friends, a spouse, family, etc.  The most satisfying jobs are careers that can develop deep relationships with other people.  Teachers, professors, pastors and athletic trainers are professions that can have high career satisfaction surveys due in part to the relationships that can be fostered through these careers.

No matter the setting, high school, college, pro sports, industrial, military, law enforcement, ATs develop relationships with the people they work with.  These relationships are vital to our job as we can begin to read when our athletes are hurting.  These relationships are also important to the athletes as they need to trust those who provide medical care for them.   John Maxwell said “People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.”

In my career, I have been able to provide athletic training care to many all-star games, playoff games, state championships and tournaments.  Most of the time very few athletes know who I am and I often end up only providing first aid care or basic taping techniques to the athletes.

But at the school district where I work, there is a constant stream of athletes, teachers, coaches and parents coming through the training room asking for me to look at this injury or evaluate this pain.  80% of the time my findings are not significant but that isn’t the point.  The school community knows that they can come into the training room to be evaluated – they value the relationship.

This skill may be the most important aspect of athletic training but it can’t be quantified.

If you are an administrator/manager contemplating the value of a full time athletic trainer to your staff, don’t just look at the services that the AT provides (prevention, recognition, rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses) look at the relationships that the AT can foster with the athletes/workers.  These relationships will provide a much better environment for your athletes/workers.

If you are an AT starting in a new position, begin to foster relationships.  Get to know the athletes, coaches, parents, administration in the traditional setting or the managers and workers in the non-traditional setting.  No one will care how well you tape an ankle or evaluate an injury if you don’t develop a camaraderie first.