Archive | October, 2016

Change – Part 1

14 Oct

 

Introduction

The book “Switch.  How to Change When Change is Hard1 applied to changing the public perceptions of the profession of athletic training.  Please make sure you have watched the previous blog entries as a prologue to this entry.  It will help you as you process the ideas and hopefully contribute your own ideas in the comments.

Prologue Part 1 – A TED Talk on “Sweat the Small Stuff

Prologue Part 2 – A review of Heath and Heath’s book “Switch How to Change  When Change is Hard“.

The Issue

The general public perceives ATs as a fitness professional, not a healthcare provider.

The Goal

To shift the public perception of athletic trainers from a fitness professional to a healthcare provider.

The Plan

Follow the Bright Spots.  Our profession understands the athletes we interact with the most have the greatest understanding of who we are and what we do.  Among NCAA Division 1 and Division 2 athletes there is a direct correlation between access and interaction to perception of healthcare professionals.2  Athletes with consistent access and regular interaction with the AT had a higher perception of the AT as a healthcare provider than those who didn’t access the AT.  Access and interaction with the AT develops understanding of the healthcare provider role of the AT.  For our professional identity to change, we must consistently accessible and regularly interact with our patients.

The Takeaway. Be accessible and be conscious of your accessibility and interactions.  Every interaction you have effects the public perception of you AND the athletic training profession.

Essential Questions

What bright spots have you observed in making change?  Why do some recognize ATs as a healthcare provider while others perceive us as fitness professionals?

References

  1. Heath C, Heath D. Switch. How to Change Things When Change is Hard. New York: Broadway Books; 2010.
  2. Unruh S. Perceptions of athletic training services by collegiate student-athletes: a measurement of athlete satisfaction. J Athl Train. 1998;33(4):347-50.

Change

6 Oct

I recently read Heath and Heath’s book on change titled “Switch. How to Change when Change is Hard”. It is available here on Amazon.  The book outlines change by appealing to the rational mind, motivating the emotional center, and shaping the situation.  Here is a video review of the book on YouTube.  If you are in any type of a leadership situation, or plan to be, I highly recommend spending $15 and purchasing the book.

How does this relate to this blog?  How does change relate to athletic training?  How does this book and idea about change have anything to do with promoting the profession of athletic training?  Great questions!

Our profession has long suffered from professional identity.  We have complained and whined among ourselves, many have quit the profession, few have worked hard to affect our identity on the national level, but still we suffer from a lack of professional identity.  We all want to do something, but what?

My previous blog entry highlighted a TED Talk with the idea that great change often comes from small adjustments.  Watch the talk if you haven’t.  Start thinking on what small changes we can make as professionals to make the Switch.

Change is hard.  We need to change our professional identity.  HOW?

Over the next few weeks, I will go through the outline in Switch to discuss my ideas on affecting a change in our professional identity.  I can’t do this alone and the more discussion we can have the greater affect we can have.