Change – Part 1

14 Oct

 

Introduction

The book “Switch.  How to Change When Change is Hard1 applied to changing the public perceptions of the profession of athletic training.  Please make sure you have watched the previous blog entries as a prologue to this entry.  It will help you as you process the ideas and hopefully contribute your own ideas in the comments.

Prologue Part 1 – A TED Talk on “Sweat the Small Stuff

Prologue Part 2 – A review of Heath and Heath’s book “Switch How to Change  When Change is Hard“.

The Issue

The general public perceives ATs as a fitness professional, not a healthcare provider.

The Goal

To shift the public perception of athletic trainers from a fitness professional to a healthcare provider.

The Plan

Follow the Bright Spots.  Our profession understands the athletes we interact with the most have the greatest understanding of who we are and what we do.  Among NCAA Division 1 and Division 2 athletes there is a direct correlation between access and interaction to perception of healthcare professionals.2  Athletes with consistent access and regular interaction with the AT had a higher perception of the AT as a healthcare provider than those who didn’t access the AT.  Access and interaction with the AT develops understanding of the healthcare provider role of the AT.  For our professional identity to change, we must consistently accessible and regularly interact with our patients.

The Takeaway. Be accessible and be conscious of your accessibility and interactions.  Every interaction you have effects the public perception of you AND the athletic training profession.

Essential Questions

What bright spots have you observed in making change?  Why do some recognize ATs as a healthcare provider while others perceive us as fitness professionals?

References

  1. Heath C, Heath D. Switch. How to Change Things When Change is Hard. New York: Broadway Books; 2010.
  2. Unruh S. Perceptions of athletic training services by collegiate student-athletes: a measurement of athlete satisfaction. J Athl Train. 1998;33(4):347-50.

Change

6 Oct

I recently read Heath and Heath’s book on change titled “Switch. How to Change when Change is Hard”. It is available here on Amazon.  The book outlines change by appealing to the rational mind, motivating the emotional center, and shaping the situation.  Here is a video review of the book on YouTube.  If you are in any type of a leadership situation, or plan to be, I highly recommend spending $15 and purchasing the book.

How does this relate to this blog?  How does change relate to athletic training?  How does this book and idea about change have anything to do with promoting the profession of athletic training?  Great questions!

Our profession has long suffered from professional identity.  We have complained and whined among ourselves, many have quit the profession, few have worked hard to affect our identity on the national level, but still we suffer from a lack of professional identity.  We all want to do something, but what?

My previous blog entry highlighted a TED Talk with the idea that great change often comes from small adjustments.  Watch the talk if you haven’t.  Start thinking on what small changes we can make as professionals to make the Switch.

Change is hard.  We need to change our professional identity.  HOW?

Over the next few weeks, I will go through the outline in Switch to discuss my ideas on affecting a change in our professional identity.  I can’t do this alone and the more discussion we can have the greater affect we can have.

Sweat the Small Stuff – TED Talk

28 Sep

It has been a long time since I have posted, much has happened in life.  I won’t air the laundry here as it isn’t the forum for it.  I will say I am back and contributing again.

Below is an outstanding TED Talk entitled “Sweat the Small Stuff”.  The key take away is little change can produce big results.  Please 12:29 of your time and watch.  It is thought provoking and has far reaching implications and applications.

https://embed.ted.com/talks/rory_sutherland_sweat_the_small_stuff

Soon to follow blog entries will build on this idea as I seek to tackle a huge issue within the profession of athletic training – our professional identity.

More to come!

Athletic Training – A world of adventure

4 Apr

I love being an athletic trainer!  Why? Variety and adventure.  This career, certainly in the traditional setting, is never dull, never the same, always changing.  Every season brings new athletes, a few new coaches, new opponents, new game strategies and new injuries.  No injury is the same because the athlete’s are different.  This alone keeps you thinking, keeps you fresh.

But the think that I think makes athletic training so fun is the world of adventure that you can enjoy within the profession.  In my 20 years, I have gotten to experience Continue reading

It is About Relationships

25 Mar

The mission of this blog is to Promote the Profession of athletic training.  The blogs are focused on skills and views that the AT has that promote the profession.  But the biggest strength we have, the biggest impact we have is in our interpersonal relationships.  The relationships aren’t just limited to the injured athletes.  It extends to Continue reading

The 3 Fundamental Purposes in Life

17 Mar

For the past several months, a group of men and I have met every 2 to 3 weeks for lunch and discuss a book.  This is a group of men from church and the conversation is decidedly from a Christian world view, but the topic is real life, not religion.  Our current book study is “Wild at Heart” by John Eldredge.  In the book, the author writes about 3 fundamental needs in life  to fulfill what God made us to be.  In my own interpretation of his teachings, these 3 areas are relationships, adventure and challenge.   I have found that these 3 fundamental needs are true and so profound.  I think one of the things I love about being an AT is that all 3 of these fundamental needs are met within the profession.

Relationships

ATs are all about relationships and the relationships we experience are unique within Continue reading

A High School AT’s Lament

11 Oct

I love my job.  I really, really do.  I love working with high school athletes, they keep me young.  I love working with other professionals (teachers, coaches, physical therapists, MDs, DOs, DCs) who pour their lives into the lives of others.  I enjoy being a role model for student athletic trainers.  I enjoy being a CI for a local ATEP.  I like writing occasionally in this blog and giving back to the profession.  I enjoy the work I get to do for PATS and for the BOC.  But there are also things I don’t like about my job.  I don’t like the weird hours that took so much from my personal life.  I don’t like the mountains of paperwork that seem to grow through the years.  I don’t like the added stress of RTP decisions when Continue reading